Search
Close this search box.
Maryland took steps to address lead poisoning; Wisconsin’s isn’t allowed to

The Laws on Lead

Reporter Talis Shelbourne, joins us to talk about her investigative report into how two states handle laws on lead: Maryland and Wisconsin.

CJ Szafir, President of the Institute for Reforming Government, returns to the show to pick up where we left off last time he was on the show to give a conservative perspective on Governor Evers’s budget address. This time, we specifically talk about education.

Wisconsin’s State Laws That Keep us Bound to Lead Pipes

Milwaukee has a lead poisoning problem. But it doesn’t have to be this way. 

Refresh: Lead can be found in the paint of homes built prior to 1978, when it was banned, as well as in the soil where paint chips fall and through the water if lead-lined pipes flake off into the system. It’s especially harmful to developing brains, causing IQ deficits, calcium deficiencies, behavioral problems and poor impulse control, among other problems.  

We are joined by reporter, Talis Shelbourne, to talk about her investigative report on how two states handle laws on lead: Maryland and Wisconsin.

The bottom line? Maryland’s lead laws have strict regulations on the lead abatement of rental properties and require landlords to undergo mandatory inspections for lead hazards prior to renting out their units. But Wisconsin laws, such as Acts 176 and 317 , prohibit the city from requiring inspections of any kind prior to a tenant moving in and only require landlords to disclose “known” lead hazards.

Guess who passed those laws? Could it be the same group of legislators who also have a lot of landlords amongst them?

Where can Gov. Evers and the GOP Legislature find common ground on education?

CJ Szafir, President of the Institute for Reforming Government, returns to the show to pick up where we left off last time he was on the show to give a conservative perspective on Governor Evers’s budget address. This time, we specifically talk about education. Education feels like the perfect example of something that everyone agrees on the outcome: better schools, better prepared and educated kids.  But the path to get there is where conflict over different policies can exist. 

You can read more about Evers budget proposal for education here: Eight things to know about Gov. Evers’ plans for K-12 public and private schools

The Cap Times did an exhaustive look at the school funding debate: School funding hangs in balance of Wisconsin budget debate
Finally, read more of IRG’s recent work on education here: K-12 COVID RELIEF and IRG Releases Comprehensive Analysis of Gov. Evers’ 2023-2025 Budget.

Share Episode:
As Goes This Week Logo